Most Recent Additions:

Large files in a pdf format (like 100+ page exegetical studies) may or may not open on your computer, or they make take a long time to resolve; if that is the case, right click them and choose save as and save them to your harddrive.  They should open easily there using Acrobat Reader.  All HTML files should open easily; almost all files added after October 2008 should look, for the most part, accurate.  However, the Hebrew characters in older documents will be misrepresented (for many, this is not a big loss) and the format will not be true to the original document at time.  I write using WordPerfect and then change these documents into PDF and HTML files.  PDF files retain the formatting and graphics exactly as they appear in WordPerfect; the HTML format, not so much.

Doctrines from this point forward will be uploaded in WordPerfect formal.  MS Word can import this text and WordPerfect office, in my opinion, is a better product than MS Office.  There are many reasons for this preference, not the least of which is being able to have a Greek and a Hebrew keyboard which can be accessed in one keystroke (something that MS Word cannot do).  Also, a recent version of WP Office can be found very cheaply (for as little as $30).  The newest version can be had by a pastor or a student for around $100.  This new format will allow pastors to more easily incorporate this into their notes.

The additions below are in the order of their being uploaded, with the most recent uploads at the very top.

  Exegeted Books in a more logical order are found here.
  Doctrines listed in alphabetical order are found here.


  • Basic Exegesis notes transferred over to Genesis 46  (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)  Uploaded 10/4/2017.  Now 214 pages.

  • Genesis 30

    Jacob Sires More Children/An Agreement with Laban

    (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)

    Genesis 30 can be broken down into two sections: (1) The sons born to Jacob in Haran and (2) the labor agreement entered into between Laban (management) and Jacob (contract worker). Although there is an odd continuity between these topics, they would have more logically been separated into two chapters. In fact, both Genesis 29 and 30 are oddly divided. Jacob begins to sire children by Leah near the end of Gen. 29 and this is continued into Gen. 30, along with fathering children by Rachel and by the personal maids of Leah and Rachel. The final 6 verses of Gen. 29 should have been combined with the first 24 verses of Gen. 30, and a chapter assembled devoted strictly to the sons of Jacob.

    The latter half of Gen. 30 (vv. 25–43) outlines an agreement that Jacob and Laban came to regarding Jacob’s future wages; and both men try to cleverly improve on their part of the agreement.

    This chapter is often noted by critics of the Bible for two reasons: (1) Jacob marries more than one woman and is coerced into impregnating his wives’ personal servants; and (2) Jacob apparently has some odd breeding theories which he puts into practice (these theories would not have been unusual for his day and time). Proponents of gay marriage point to Jacob’s polygamous marriage and conclude, “If he can marry more than one woman, then two men can marry.” Critics point to Jacob’s breeding schemes and say, “This is stupid and unscientific and it is in the Bible!” These objections will be met head-on and explained within the exegesis of this chapter.

    There are two odd topics found in this chapter, which are closely related. Rachel attempts to use mandrakes in order to cause a child to be born to her; and Jacob cuts up branches and places them in the water of Laban’s sheep and goats, hoping to affect their breeding outcomes. Both of these schemes have caused commentators no little consternation over the years—why is this goofy stuff found in the Bible? As we will find, these two odd topics are very closely related and teach us a marvelous bit of doctrine. I believe that the development of this particular relationship is unique to this commentary.


    genesislinks3.gif

    Jacob’s Goats (a photo); from The Scripture Says.org; accessed September 15, 2017. Because of this incident, oddly-colored goats are often called Jacob’s goats in the Middle Eastern world.


    Also, I believe that this chapter is key to explaining why Joseph is so different from his older brothers. Why does he have personal integrity when they seem to have none? There are many clues in this chapter. This is also unique to this chapter, but the germ of this idea came from Milton Spenser Terry and Fales H. Newhall (two men you have never heard of), whose work is found in Whedon's Commentary on the Old and New Testaments.

    Quite frankly, you will be hard-pressed to find another chapter in the Bible with as many applications to real life as will be discussed in this chapter.

    Complete at 433 pages.

  • Doctrine of the Pivot  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  The greatest flood disaster in the history of the United States occurred August 25–31, 2017.  What was quite amazing about this disaster is, although the flooding and damage from rain was horrendous, about 95% or more of the people in the Houston area continued to have electricity.  That was grace from God in a monumental disaster.

    In watching the reports of Hurricane Harvey, and seeing the eye of this massive hurricane and the mighty storms which are spun off, it reminded me of the Doctrine of the Pivot, which R. B. Thieme, Jr. taught; the pivot of mature believers and the spinoff of the reversionist believers.  This is where we are in this nation and where we are in the Houston area.  Posted 8/28/17
  • The Seed of the Woman  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  The sin nature is passed down genetically by the man, as the man sinned against God knowing what he was doing.  The woman was deceived.  A child born from a woman only would not have a sin nature.  The fact that a virgin gave birth to the Lord was not simply a matter of fulfilling a prophecy; but it was also necessary so that the Lord was born apart from the imputation of sin.  This doctrine begins in Gen. 3; is found in Isaiah, in two gospels, and Paul speaks of it as well.  It is an amazing doctrine, which retains consistency over a period of 2000 years; and not fully developed until long after the completion of the New Testament.  Uploaded August 21, 2017.

  • Genesis 29

    Jacob Marries Both Leah and Rachel; and Sires Four Sons

    (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)

    Uploaded August 21, 2017.
    genesislinks2.gif

    In Gen. 29, Jacob arrives at his destination in Padan-aram, coming upon some shepherds who know Laban (Jacob’s uncle) and the Laban family. When discussing the use of the well, Rachel, Jacob’s first cousin, comes onto the scene, leading a flock of sheep. Jacob tells her who he is and she runs back to her family to tell her father. Her father immediately comes out to meet Jacob, to invite him into their home.


    A month goes by and Jacob is apparently helping with the sheep and Laban’s ranch, and Laban asks what he would like to be paid. Jacob suggests that he work for 7 years in order to marry Rachel, with whom he was in love. Laban accepts this offer.

    7 years later, Laban throws a wedding party for Jacob, and, at the end, Jacob goes to the bed of his new bride. In the morning, Jacob awakens to find that he has married Leah, the older sister, and not Rachel. He goes immediately to Laban and confronts him, and Laban gives him a phony excuse. Laban proposes that Jacob work another 7 years, and that he would also be allowed to marry Rachel. Jacob agrees to this. At the end of Gen. 29, Leah has given birth to 4 of Jacob’s sons.

    One dispute out there in the theological world is, how old is Jacob at this time? Whereas I expected this to be a very difficult question, it is not (as long at you are not expecting a specific and definitive answer). The issues here are not complex.

    An important topic of discussion is, Jacob’s spiritual growth or lack thereof. We know what Jacob was like—he was a scheming manipulator. However, before leaving the land of Canaan, Jacob had a meeting with God (Gen. 28). This certainly impacted his life. The question is, how much? In the theological world, there has been a lot of discussion of this. And, related to that question is, how much growth or impact does personal interaction with God do for us? That is, why doesn’t God appear to me and give me a spiritual boost?

    This leads us to consider the fact that there are some believers who somehow think that they got the short end of the stick, because they have been born into a time where they will never hear Jesus teach the sermon on the mount or one of His many parables; and we will never have some great vision of God where God speaks to us from heaven. On the contrary, that is what is amazing about living in the Church Age—we have all of that and more in our lives! Right now is the greatest time for the believer to be alive! We have it better than Peter and John did, who learned Bible doctrine directly from Jesus Christ. This will be one of the very important topics of discussion in this chapter, and one which few teachers discuss. Too many believers today are trying to recreate Pentecost; are trying to present our God as a God Who is doing many visible miracles today. Their approach to the Christian life means that they neuter themselves.

    Another issue of interest is, we know in this chapter that Laban intentionally deceived Jacob, so that Jacob ended up marrying both of Laban’s daughters. An unanswered (and often, unasked) question is, what part did Leah and Rachel play in the deception of Jacob? I attempt to answer this question (although that will require some speculation).

    It is also fascinating that the first 4 sons of Leah both parallel the events of the Exodus and the gospel message.

    Finally, the text of this chapter, combined with the narrative in later chapters, suggests to me how the book of Genesis was written. At a point in this chapter, I will give what I believe is a unique explanation as to how Genesis was compiled.

    Complete at 397 pages.

  • Genesis 28 Isaac Sends Jacob to the East/Jacob's Ladder (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). This is complete and uploaded (I have been working on this chapter off and on since 2013).  Uploaded July 19,2017.
    genesis2811.gif

    In Gen. 27, it has been determined that Jacob will go east to marry a woman from their family rather than a Canaanite woman, as his brother Esau had married. Gen. 28 begins with his father, Isaac, giving him a blessing before he goes—a blessing which recognizes Jacob as being the line of God’s promise.

    Esau, his twin brother, takes notice of this and the importance of marrying someone from the family, so, even though he was already married to two women of Canaan, Esau then married a daughter of Ishmael (Isaac’s half brother). One thing that I have observed is, some commentators make an attempt to tell you why Esau was a terrible person and why Jacob was a pretty good guy; and so, God chose Jacob and did not choose Esau for the line of promise. This is simply incorrect and there are problems with both men. Twice in Scripture, God says, “Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated.” This verse is correctly explained within this chapter.

    Meanwhile, Jacob traveled north, going through Luz, where he had a dream-vision of angels going from earth to heaven and back again; and God is above all of this (this is often referred to as Jacob’s ladder). God speaks to Jacob and gives him the promises previously delivered to Abraham and to Isaac; and then God promises to be with Jacob wherever he goes; and that He would bring Jacob back to this land.

    When Jacob awakens the next morning, he is amazed at the place where he is, and renames it Bethel (which means, house of God). At the end of this chapter, Jacob makes a vow to God about tithing. Many commentators do not appear to get Jacob, and he is given far too much credit for his spiritual perspicacity. Remember, Jacob had only just left his family a day or so after he had gone to great lengths to deceive his own father in order to get a better blessing than his brother. He has not changed dramatically in the space of a few days. This chapter allows us, to a limited degree, to get into Jacob’s head. This study attempts to do that, without assuming too much.

    There are a lot of fascinating topics which are brought up in this chapter. Have you ever seen someone spell God as G-d or as G*d? This will be explained. Jacob has quite a wild vision, of angels going up and down some sort of ladder/elevator/escalator; after this vision, God tells Jacob what he needs to know. So, why the vision of the angels? What was that all about? Jesus suggests that one of His disciples might have a vision similar to what Jacob saw; so why did He say that? In this and the previous chapter, Jacob was blessed three times. What is that all about and what are we to make of it?

    There is a great deal of supplementary material covered in this chapter. Many have alleged that the Bible is filled with contradictions—therefore, many pages are devoted to taking some of these contradictions and explaining them; which set of doctrines is followed by The Uniqueness of the Bible. There are several other very important doctrines in this chapter: The Spiritual Life in the Old and New Testaments; Jacob's Clarifying Moment; and A Spiritually-Empowered Jesus Christ is our Spiritual Model. Also presented: a new understanding of the assembling, writing, and ordering of the book of Genesis.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, 3 sets of original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 361 pages.

  • The initial Introduction to Exodus is now posted and can be accessed via Exodus Links (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) (folder).  It is a compilation of the work of a dozen or so commentators along with my own work.  It includes an excellent overall summary and a chapter by chapter summary of the Book of Exodus.  113 pages. Uploaded on July 16, 2017.
  • Exodus 1-8 are all updated and uploaded; basic exegesis, 3 original translations, selections from 90+ translations, and notes transferred from original Exodus study.  Approximately 1500 pages.  Accessed via Exodus Links (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) (folder).  Uploaded on July 10, 2017.
  • Genesis 1-45 are all updated with basic exegesis notes.  Gen. 1-28 are complete studies (although I will go back eventually and do some more updating).  See Genesis Links: (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  (Folder) Uploaded June 28, 2017.
  • Exodus 8 is uploaded; basic exegesis, 3 original translations, selections from 90+ translations, and notes transferred from original Exodus study.  230 pages.  Accessed via Exodus Links (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) (folder).  Uploaded on June 27, 2017.
  • The basic exegesis (and 3 original translations) has been done for Exodus 5, 6, and 7.  Links to these chapters are found in Exodus Links (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) (folder).  Uploaded on June 21, 2017.
  • Basic Exegesis Series; AKA Genesis Lessons #401-450 now posted.  This is all about the famine of Egypt and Canaan, and how the sons of Jacob go up to Egypt to purchase grain.  This is one of the great narratives of Scripture and these lessons are approximately 5 pages each, each lesson designed to be read in a 10-15 minute sitting.  These are not complex lessons; but they are more detailed than most which you will read. (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  June 21, 2017.
  • Christianity is Based Upon Old Testament Yehowah Worship 
    There is the confused notion by some that the Old Testament teaches Judaism and that the New Testament teaches Christianity. This is untrue. Orthodox Christianity is firmly based upon the Old Testament and Old Testament Yehowah Worship.  This doctrine compares the fundamental doctrines of Christianity to their origins found in the Old Testament.
    (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)  Posted 5/8/2017
  • 1Kings 6 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).                                     Solomon Builds the Temple

    1Kings 6 is all about the specifications and details of Solomon building of the Temple of God. In the previous chapter, the materials needed, the workmen needed, and how they were all gathered was at the forefront; in this chapter, it is putting all of these materials together to build the Temple, the Holy of Holies, the annex, and the courtyard. It took 7 years to build the Temple.

    This is a record—perhaps the earliest record—of the building of a religious structure in the ancient world, with specifications, designs, and finishing work all presented in a fairly careful narrative. The Temple was destroyed twice after this, rebuilt twice; and then destroyed for the third time. No doubt, this chapter was consulted for subsequent buildings of this structure.

    The Temple of Israel’s God was unique among all religious buildings in human history. No one thought that God lived there or was confined in any way by this Temple; and only a very small percentage of the people of Israel ever actually entered into the Temple.

    In this particular chapter, we will study the relationship between priests, prophets and kings (prophets, as we know them, did not arise until Israel decided to have a king—and there is a reason for that).

    Some of the important studies/doctrines in this chapter include: how New Testament Christianity is based firmly in the Old Testament worship of Yehowah; we compare Kings David and Solomon and why Solomon built the Temple and David did not; we study the difference between statutes, commandments and judgments; improvements which have occurred in the modern Catholic church (these are Orthodox Christian studies, not Catholic studies); Solomon, Solomon’s Temple, and the Millennial reign of Jesus Christ; we study the Ark of God and the Holy of Holies; and we study how Solomon it is type of Jesus Christ in the Millennium.
    kings_links3.gif

    Solomon’s Temple – Illustrated (a graphic). Taken from ABC Parish; accessed April 13, 2017.

    Complete at 407 pages. Posted 5/8/2017
  • 1Kings 5 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).   Solomon Organizes the Builders for the Temple

    In 1Kings 5, Solomon and his father’s friend, King Hiram connect, both having genuine respect for one another. They will work together to gather and prepare the raw materials for both the Temple and (later) for Solomon’s palace. Most of this chapter is devoted to the negotiation between the two men and the number of men involved in this project.

    Some of the very important short doctrines covered in this chapter are: The Temple and the Line of Promise; Why Solomon Builds the Temple, and Not David; Hiram, Solomon and Self-interest; The believer and ministries of others; a discussion on trade and commerce between different countries; and at least two discussions built upon commentators who think that building the Temple was a mistake.
    sagriafamilia.jpg


    Photo of the Sagrada Familia from Google (including 360° photos); accessed March 6, 2017.

    When I begin a particular chapter, I never know exactly what I am going to cover or what information I will be conveying. It is a very organic process, based first on the material before me; and secondly, on where this material might lead me (sometimes, this is combined with things occurring out in the real world). This particular chapter led me on a number of interesting tangents. What about personal or doctrinal attacks on other pastors or upon other local churches? What about people who attend the congregation who are gay (who think that they are gay)? Also, I found this a good chapter to insert one of my favorite secular columns, George Will: Pencils and Politics. Also included is the fascinating list Genocides and Political Killings of the 20th Century.

    Also discussed: Typology in the Old Testament and the Church Age; Free Enterprise and Trade Between Countries; Why God Allows Manuscript Errors; The Difference Between Teaching Mathematics and Teaching the Bible (and why most doctrinal churches only teach 3–4 times per week)

    Completed 3/16/17.  223 pages.
  • Updated: Doctrinal Terms (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) updated  5/8/17.  37 pages. 
    Old Testament topics (a document that tells which topics are covered in the various chapters which are posted)  (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) Now 390 pages.
  • Classifying Various Bible Translations classifies about 100 English translations of the Bible.  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  Which are accurate?  Where are good reading Bibles?  Which offer a unique perspective?  All of these questions answered, in order to help you determine which Bible (s) to read.  This is a short chart, perhaps 2-3 pages.  Added February 20, 2017.
  • Extensive material added to Exodus 4 and Genesis 41 & 42.  Check Genesis Links: (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  (Folder) and Exodus Links (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) (folder).  Uploaded on February 20, 2017.
  • There have been advances on the Genesis and Exodus chapter by chapter series.  Check Genesis Links: (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  (Folder) and Exodus Links (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) (folder).  February 15, 2017.
  • Basic Exegesis Series; AKA Genesis Lessons #401-431 now posted.  This is all about the famine of Egypt and Canaan, and how the sons of Jacob go up to Egypt to purchase grain.  This is one of the great narratives of Scripture and these lessons are approximately 5 pages each, designed to be read one at a time.  These are not complex lessons; but they are more detailed than most which you will read. (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  February 15, 2017.
  • Basic Exegesis Series; AKA Genesis Lessons #301-400. (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  We begin these lessons by following Jacob, for the most part.  He cheats his twin brother Esau out of a blessing from Isaac, and then, because of the anger of Esau, finds that he must leave the land of promise.  Jacob works for his uncle Laban outside of Canaan, and marries Laban's two daughters.  In this set of lessons, we examine the doctrines of Hatred, Emotions, Heart, Emotional Revolt, Reversionism, the Spiritual Life in the Old and New Testaments, Christian Giving, Biblical Marriage, Alternative Forms of Marriage in the Bible.  We also examine many of the so-called Bible contradictions, the Uniqueness of the Bible, Why Moses Did Not Write Genesis, the Reasons Why Genesis was Written at the Time of the Events of Genesis, Humility, Jacob and Esau, Rape in the Bible, God's 6 Appearances to Jacob, Benjamin as a Type of Christ, and the Parallels between Jacob the Man and Israel the Nation. Some of these doctrines are unique to this study, and found nowhere else. Uploaded Jan. 11, 2017.
  • As some of you know, I send out short, weekly study in Genesis; and at this point, we are 420 lessons into this study.  Lessons #1-420 are now posted.  Genesis Lessons 401–500 HTML  Genesis Lessons 401–500 PDF   Genesis Lessons 401–500 WPD These first 20 lessons take us from Joseph as a teenage boy to Joseph in Egypt, first as a slave and then as a prisoner and then standing before Pharaoh.  I thought I had already posted this, but apparently, I did not.  Uploaded Jan. 11, 2017.
  • The basic exegesis has been completed for Genesis 47 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD), Genesis 48 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD), Genesis 49 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD), and Genesis 50 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).  The Hebrew dictionaries and the list of OT Topics covered has also been updated.  What has and has not been done can be found in the Genesis Links: (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  (Folder).  So far, every chapter in Genesis has been exegeted word-by-word with 3 original translations; and the first 46 chapters have a plethora of translations included.  Jan. 9, 2017
  • 1Kings 7 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Solomon’s Palace and the Temple Are Completed

    Basic exegesis and 3 original translations only. I had tremendous difficulty translating some of the passages here.  Not everything has been translated, but the Hebrew tables are in place.  168 pages.  12/11/16
  • 1Kings 8 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). King Solomon Dedicates the Completed Temple

    Basic exegesis and 3 original translations only. 177 pages.  12/11/16
  • Genesis 28 Isaac Sends Jacob to the East/Esau Takes an Ishmaelite Wife (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded 12/3/2016.

    In Gen. 27, it has been determined that Jacob will go east to marry a woman from their family rather than a Canaanite woman, as his brother Esau had married. Gen. 28 begins with his father, Isaac, giving him a blessing before he goes—a blessing which recognizes Jacob as being the line of God’s promise.

    Esau, his twin brother, takes notice of this and the importance of marrying someone from the family, so, even though he was already married to two women of Canaan, Esau then married a daughter of Ishmael (Isaac’s half brother).

    Meanwhile, Jacob traveled north, going through Luz, where he had a dream-vision of angels going from earth to heaven and back again; and God is above all of this. God speaks to Jacob and gives him the promises previously delivered to Abraham and to Isaac; and then God promises to be with Jacob wherever he goes; and that He would bring Jacob back to this land.

    When Jacob awakens the next morning, he is amazed at the place where he is, and renames it Bethel (which means, house of God). At the end of this chapter, Jacob makes a vow to God about tithing.

    There is a great deal of supplementary material covered in this chapter. Many have alleged that the Bible is filled with contradictions—therefore, many pages are devoted to taking some of these contradictions and explaining them; which set of doctrines is followed by The Uniqueness of the Bible. There are two other very important doctrines in this chapter: The Spiritual Life in the Old and New Testaments; and A Spiritually-Empowered Jesus Christ is our Spiritual Model.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, 3 sets of original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 209 pages.

  • Genesis 29 Jacob Marries Leah and Rachel and Sires Four Sons (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded 12/3/2016.

    In Gen. 29, Jacob arrives at his destination in Padan-aram, coming upon some shepherds who know Laban (Jacob’s uncle) and the Laban family. When discussing the use of the well, Rachel, Jacob’s first cousin, comes onto the scene, leading a flock of sheep. Jacob tells her who he is and she runs back to her family to tell her father. Her father immediately comes out to meet Jacob, to invite him into their home.

    A month goes by and Jacob is apparently helping with the sheep and Laban’s ranch, and Laban asks what he would like to be paid. Jacob suggests that he work for 7 years in order to marry Rachel, with whom he was in love. Laban accepts this offer.

    7 years later, Laban throws a wedding party for Jacob, and, at the end, Jacob goes to the bed of his new bride. In the morning, Jacob awakens to find that he has married Leah, the older sister, and not Rachel. He goes immediately to Laban and confronts him, and Laban gives him a phony excuse. Laban proposes that Jacob work another 7 years, and that he would also be allowed to marry Rachel. Jacob agrees to this. At the end of Gen. 29, Leah has given birth to 4 of Jacob’s sons.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, 3 sets of original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 269 pages.

  • Genesis 30 Jacob Sires More Children/An Agreement with Laban (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded 12/3/2016.

    Genesis 30 can be broken down into two sections: (1) The sons born to Jacob in Haran and (2) the labor agreement entered into between Laban (management) and Jacob (contract worker). Although there is an odd continuity between these topics, they would have more logically been separated into two chapters.

    In fact, both Genesis 29 and 30 are oddly divided. Jacob begins to sire children by Leah near the end of Gen. 29 and this is continued into Gen. 30, along with fathering children by Rachel and by the personal maids of Leah and Rachel. The final 6 verses of Gen. 29 should have been combined with the first 24 verses of Gen. 30, and a chapter assembled devoted strictly to the sons of Jacob.

    The latter half of Gen. 30 (vv. 25–43) outlines an agreement that Jacob and Laban came to regarding Jacob’s future wages; and both men try to cleverly improve on their part of the agreement.

    This chapter is often noted by critics of the Bible for two reasons: (1) Jacob marries more than one woman; and (2) Jacob apparently has some odd breeding theories which he puts into practice (these theories would not have been unusual for his day and time). Proponents of gay marriage point to Jacob’s polygamous marriage and conclude, “If he can marry more than one woman, then two men can marry.” Critics point to Jacob’s breeding schemes and say, “This is stupid and unscientific and it is in the Bible!” These objections will be met head-on and explained in the exegesis of this chapter.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, 3 sets of original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 272 pages.
  • As some of you know, I send out short, weekly study in Genesis; and at this point, we are 420 lessons into this study.  Lessons #1-420 are now posted.  Genesis Lessons 401–500 HTML  Genesis Lessons 401–500 PDF   Genesis Lessons 401–500 WPD These first 20 lessons take us from Joseph as a teenage boy to Joseph in Egypt, first as a slave and then as a prisoner and then standing before Pharaoh.  Uploaded Nov. 20, 2016
  • Genesis 31 Jacob Leaves Laban’s Compound (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded November 25, 2016.

    Jacob has worked for Laban for 20 years and it has become clear to him that his work and his faithfulness are not really valued by his employer. Furthermore, God has told Jacob to take his family back to the land of Canaan. Genesis 31 is all about Jacob moving his family back to the Land of Promise using his tried and (un) true approach of deception and sneakiness. He convinces his wives to leave with him (which does not require much convincing); so they sneak out of Haran, having a 3-day head start. However, Laban, when he sees that Jacob has left with his family, and that his deity figurines are missing as well, chases down Jacob and catches up to him in the hill country of Gilead (which is east of the Jordan River). The end of this chapter is their final confrontation where both men air out their grievances with one another, and then manage to find a way to go their separate ways, establishing a non-aggression pact between them.

    The following studies and short doctrines are found in Genesis 31: What God Achieved in Jacob's Life; Standards of Behavior Agreed to before the Mosaic Law; When Societal Norms Change; What about Jesus' warning not to judge?; When the most fundamental laws are changed; The Husband's Responsibility in Marriage; and Romans 8:28 in the Life of Jacob

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, and 3 sets of original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 354 pages.
  • Genesis 32 Jacob Returns to Canaan and Wrestles with God (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded Nov. 12, 2016

    After sorting things out with his Uncle Laban, Jacob nears the Land of Promise, where he will have a scheduled meeting with his brother Esau, from whom Jacob is estranged. This chapter is all about Jacob’s anticipation and worries. He gives a most marvelous prayer, and then he falls back to manipulative, human viewpoint solutions. Finally, because Jacob has spent his life in conflict with Jesus Christ, he will find himself actually wrestling with the Lord right before dawn.

    Readers can be easily confused by Gen. 32, because this is Jacob acting positively schizophrenic. On the one hand, he prays this most marvelous prayer to God; and on the other hand, he keeps trying to solve his own problems with human viewpoint solutions. In a sense, he finds himself in conflict with God—does he depend upon God or does he search for a human viewpoint solution to the problems in his life? In his own soul, Jacob cannot seem to decide, does he place his faith in God or in himself? He is wrestling in his soul and God brings this point home by actually wrestling with Jacob in his real life. In any given circumstance, will Jacob be guided by his sin nature or will God prevail [= Israel] over Jacob’s sin nature?

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 216 pages.
  • Genesis 33 Jacob and his Family Return to Canaan (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).
    Uploaded 11/6/2016

    20 years previous, Jacob escaped Canaan with his life, having just deceived his father in order to claim Esau’s blessings. When Esau found out, he was angry, threatening to kill Jacob at a later date.

    Here, the two brothers meet, both men separated from Isaac their father, and both men have apparently matured and put their past behind them. It was a congenial meeting between former rivals, despite Jacob’s apprehension the night before. In fact, Esau invites Jacob to join him in Seir, and Jacob appears to agree to this, but he goes in a different direction, remaining in the land promised to his father and grandfather.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 142 pages.
  • Genesis 34 The Rape of Dinah/The Slaughter of Shechem (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded 11/6/2016

    Genesis 34 is a chapter where the plan of God moves forward, despite the actions of the people in the chapter (we will see this same sort of thing in Gen. 36, 37 and 38). God’s plan always moves forward, whether man is cooperative or not. This chapter also foreshadows the future. The sons of Israel (Jacob) cannot remain in the land because (1) they will either be subsumed by another family or (2) they will be destroyed by the people around them. Or, another way to say this, they will become corrupted and then destroyed. At the end of this chapter, Jacob bemoans his situation: “Levi and Simeon, you have made me odious to the people of this land, and they will gather together and destroy us because we are few in number.” And this is why God will have to remove them from the land.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 211 pages.

  • Genesis 35  Jacob’s Sons/The Deaths of Rachel and Isaac

    (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)  Uploaded Oct. 28, 2016. 

    Gen. 35 is a chapter of milestones: (1) Jacob and his family move to Bethel; (2) Deborah, Rebekah’s maid dies; (3) God reappears to Jacob and Jacob worships Him; (4) Rachel bears Jacob’s 12th son but then dies during childbirth; (5) Reuben is intimate with one of Jacob’s mistresses; (6) the 12 sons of Jacob are listed; and (7) Isaac dies.

    What is remarkable is the great grace that God had given to both Jacob and Esau (recounted in this chapter and the next). How petty and ridiculous had been their undue competition and jealousies 20 years previous.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 208 pages.
  • Genesis 36  Nation Esau (Edom)  (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) Uploaded Oct. 26, 2016. 

    This is the genealogy of Esau. Esau is Jacob’s twin brother, of whom God has said, “Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated.” Gen. 36 is Esau’s line, including the many rulers who have come from his loins. The line of Esau seemed poised to become great in the land.

    On the surface, Gen. 36 appears to be nothing more than a list of names, most of whom are lost to history and not found in the Bible again. However, there are a great many lessons that we can take from this chapter—contemporary and spiritual.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 183 pages.

  • Genesis 37 Joseph and His Brothers (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).  Uploaded Oct. 20, 2016.   Gen. 37 begins the final section of the book of Genesis, which centers on the life of Joseph (with the exception of Gen. 38). From the beginning, young Joseph is clearly at odds with his older half-brothers, who resent the favoritism of their father towards Joseph. Joseph has 2 dreams which particularly irritate his older half-brothers because they indicate that he would rule over them. When the brothers confront Joseph next, away from their father, they plot to kill him. Reuben convinces them not to kill him, but to simply throw him into a pit (hoping to rescue the boy later). Judah suggests that Joseph be sold as a slave and the other brothers agree to this.

    Because Joseph is sold to traders, his older brothers send back Joseph’s bloodied and torn tunic, to make it appear that he had been attacked and killed by a wild animal. Jacob is heartbroken to receive this tunic and mourns inconsolably afterwards.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 267 pages.

  • Genesis 38 Judah and Tamar (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).   Uploaded Oct. 20, 2016.   Judah leaves his family and takes up with a Canaanite woman, having 3 children by her. Judah decides to choose a wife (Tamar) for his first son, but he dies. The wife is given to his second son in order to raise up seed for his deceased brother (aka, a levirate marriage), but then he dies. Then Joseph has to figure out what to do about Tamar.

    Exegesis from the Hebrew, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, original notes from the exegesis, from Genesis & Basic Exegesis. 228 pages.
  • Genesis 39 Joseph, Potiphar and Potiphar's Wife (HTML) (PDF) (WPD
    Exegesis, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, notes from Genesis & Basic Exegesis.  175 pages  Uploaded 10/3/2016.
  • Genesis Links   (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  These links indicate that Gen. 1-46 have been uploaded, but in various states of completion (which are given chapter by chapter in this links document).  This is a nearly 10,000 page exegetical study of Genesis, which is still incomplete.  As long as God gives me the grace, I will continue to work on it.  Updated 9/26/2016
  • Genesis 40 Joseph, the Chief Baker and the Chief Cupbearer (HTML) (PDF) (WPD
    Exegesis, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, notes from Genesis & Basic Exegesis.  150 pages  Uploaded 9/26/2016.
  • Genesis 41 Pharaoh’s Dream and the Famine of Egypt (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)  
    Exegesis, 3 original translations, 90+ translations, notes from Genesis.  302 pages.  Uploaded 9/26/16.
  • The Scientific Achievements of Ancient Hamitic Peoples  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Uploaded 9/25/2016.  This is a list by Arthur Custance of scientific discoveries and achievements of the Hamitic peoples (I first saw this in Clough's Dawn of the Kingdom).  What was known in the early eras is quite amazing.  This is quite an amazing list, and when you read through it, you will see why both Clough and myself reproduced it.
  • 1Kings 5 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).   Solomon Organizes the Builders for the Temple

    Basic exegesis and 3 original translations only.  Uploaded 9/25/2016
  • 1Kings 6 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).                                     Solomon Builds the Temple

    Basic exegesis and 3 original translations only.  Uploaded 9/25/2016
  • The Doctrine of Intercalation (HTML)   (PDF)   (WPD) is updated again, as of Sept. 9, 2016.  I noticed that the vocabulary would have been difficult for some believers, so I added a vocabulary chart.  Another verse is added as well.  Intercalation is where we find the 1st and 2nd advents of Jesus Christ presented without any intervening events.  However, intercalated (inserted) between these events is the Church Age.  Because the church age was a mystery age, hidden from the OT Jews, it is not referenced in the OT, but skipped over.  There are at least 30 OT passages in which this occurs.
  • Genesis 42 Joseph’s Brothers Come to Buy Grain in Egypt (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) 
  • Genesis 43 Jacob’s Sons Return to Egypt with Benjamin (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)  For both chapters, the basic Hebrew exegesis completed along with 3 original translations; 90+ translations added in; notes from Genesis added in. Uploaded 9/9/2016
  • All links, notes and updates of Genesis can be gotten here:
    Genesis Links
    (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  (Folder)
  • Genesis 27 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) Jacob Deceives his Father Isaac

    Posted 8/29/2016
    genesislinks1.gif

    Genesis 27 is a deceptively simple chapter, where everything appears to be said and explained, but there are events, conversations, and motivations which are important to this narrative which are not clearly laid out. Gen. 27 appears to be simple and it appears to have all the relevant information given to us, but as we examine it more and more thoroughly, it becomes quite clear that there is a great deal of hidden and unspoken information.


    Isaac Blessing Jacob by Gerbrand van den Eeckhout (Oil on canvas) 1642; from Web Gallery of Art; accessed August 7, 2016.

    Gen. 27 is rarely understood, despite its being about a fairly simple series of events. For this reason, few commentators have correctly explained all of what is going on. This chapter is all about words; it is all about the words that Isaac will say regarding his two sons. That is what the entire conflict is over. The key to understanding this chapter, the blessing given to Jacob and then the blessing given to Esau is the very fact that the words spoken by Isaac have power. They are meaningful, even when they are spoken in a gathering of only two or three.

    To understand Gen. 27, you have to understand that, when Isaac blesses Jacob, that blessing has meaning and power. Once it has been said, it is out there, already in effect; and it cannot be withdrawn. If Isaac could simply withdraw his words, then his words would have been meaningless in the first place. Extenuating circumstances do not nullify the words spoken by Isaac.

    It is clear that Jacob is one of the least deserving men of Scripture, who has received some of the greatest blessings of God. This is grace; this is the plan of God. It is men like Jacob who often give us very imperfect believers more hope than a man like Abraham.

    Jacobian narratives typically leave out a great many details which can often be supplied using a little logical deduction. Sometimes his narratives are accused of being contradictory not because they are, but because they leave out some details. Much of this narrative is helped along with a few details that may be deduced, and which help explain any questions about the accuracy of the narrative. At the end of this chapter, there will be a summary, where the motivations and actions of the principal characters are clearly laid out, so that everything that happens makes perfect sense. At the end, you will understand what each principal knows (and doesn’t know) and what motivates them to do what they do.

    This narrative is about the foibles of man, the free will of man, and the sovereignty of God; the actions of man playing out according to their volition; and the plan of God moving forward, despite the things which man does.

    As a personal aside, I have worked on this particular chapter on and off for 3 years (2013 to 2016). 505 pages.

  • Genesis 43  

    (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)   Jacob’s Sons Return to Egypt with Benjamin 
    The basic Hebrew exegesis completed along with 3 original translations; 90+ translations added in; notes from Genesis added in.  Posted 8/29/2016  Genesis 44-45 also posted.

  • In church today, Bobby was teaching the dual meaning of the words of Caiaphas the High Priest, and how Caiaphas proposed the killing of Jesus to the Sanhedrin; and yet, God the Holy Spirit used the exact words from Caiaphas to state the gospel of Jesus Christ, to prophesy that Jesus would die for our sins.  This is an excellent illustration of the "Dual Authorship of Scripture" (where the human author means one thing by the words that he writes; and God the Holy Spirit means something else, by using those same words).  Therefore, I have updated this doctrine with this additional passage.  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Updated 8/21/2016.
  • Genesis 46 Jacob’s Entire Family in Egypt (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) Posted 8/19/2016

    As Jacob (Israel) travels toward Egypt, he stops off in Beersheba to offer up sacrifices to the Revealed God, and God appears to Jacob and tells him that it is okay to be leaving the Land of Promise and moving to Egypt.

    A list of all the males descended from Jacob, along with the two females, are given. His wives are also named.

    Joseph meets his father Jacob after 20 years.

    Joseph gives his family instructions in case Pharaoh asks them about their livelihoods.

    Basic Hebrew exegesis, 3 original translations, and 90+ translations. The notes from Genesis are transferred over.
  • Genesis 45 Joseph Makes Himself Known to His Brothers (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)

    Because Judah offers up himself for Benjamin (Gen. 45), Joseph, known to his brothers as the prime minister of Egypt, can no longer hide his identify from his brothers. He reveals himself to them. He explains to them how, despite their actions against him 20+ years ago, God had a purpose in all of it, which purpose is being fulfilled before their very eyes—delivering them and Egypt from the great famine.

    Joseph invites his entire family to live with him in Egypt because of the great famine. His brothers return to Canaan to fetch their father Jacob.

    Basic Hebrew exegesis, 3 original translations, and 90+ translations. The notes from Genesis are transferred over.
  • Genesis 1-40 are all updated (3 chapters did not need updating); Genesis 41-44 added 8/4/16.  Some of these are basic exegesis files; and some of them have the 90+ translations included.  To access, go to: Genesis Links  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  (Folder) (which includes basic information about uploaded files Genesis 1-44).
  • Deuteronomy 16 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)    3 Feasts; Choosing Judges;Outlawing Idolatry

    Posted June 23, 2016.  In Deut. 16, Moses spends most of this chapter discussing the 3 feasts which require a gathering of the people of Israel to one place. Then, from the feasts, which represent communion with God, Moses speaks of choosing judges and officials throughout the new land, who, they themselves, represent God’s judgment to the people.

    Moses then speaks of idolatry, which is not allowed, and represents the greatest violation of the laws of God.

    Doctrines covered in this chapter: The Passover; the Feast of Unleavened Bread; the Feast of Weeks; and the Feast of Booths. Jesus as our Passover; the Asherah and Idolatry.
    deuteronomylinks.gif


    Important topics and discussions found in this chapter: the misguided JEPD theory (that the Law of Moses was not written by Moses but by a variety of people, aka Documentary Hypothesis); since the United States provides both the gospel and Bible teaching, a discussion about opening up our borders to all who want to come here; the forgiveness taught to the Jews in Scripture as opposed to century-old grudges held by Muslims; revolutionary equality before God (slaves were encouraged to come to the feasts); revolutionary concepts of justice (which we take for granted today); the Holy Spirit as the Divine Editor of Scripture; alleged similarities to contemporary heathen feasts; and how a good judicial system contributes and encourages prosperity in a nation.


    Deuteronomy 16:19 (NIV) (a graphic); from twitter.com; accessed June 20, 2016.


    Like nearly every chapter in Scripture, there are practical applications to our lives today; and there is clearly a connection between the concepts of justice found in this chapter and our judicial system that we have today in the United States. 247 pages.

  • If you are ordering lessons from R. B. Thieme, Jr. ministries, and you need a document that you can edit to keep track of what you have ordered and what you have listened to:                R. B. Thieme, Jr. lessons list that can be edited.  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  (DOC)
  • In case you want to see if Bob exegeted a particular passage or subject, it can be found here in several different formats. R. B. Thieme, Jr. All Lesson Summaries (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  (DOC) 581 pages (6/21/2016)
  • Additional maps, text and/or formatting added to the following documents: Introduction to Joshua (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  The Book of Numbers   (HTML)   (PDF)  (WPD).  Introduction to Deuteronomy  (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)Deuteronomy 2  (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).  6/19/2016
  • Exodus 4  (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)  Uploaded 6/13/16 Basic Hebrew exegesis and original translations.

    Exodus 4 is simply a continuation of Ex. 3. Moses is still out in the desert speaking to God. When God tells Moses what He wants him to do, Moses objects, eloquently arguing that he is too inarticulate to speak before Pharaoh and bring him God’s message. God tells Moses that his brother is able to talk, so he will be the spokesman for Moses, who is the spokesman for God; and, oh by the way, Aaron is on his way right now to meet Moses.

    Moses and Aaron meet, then go to the elders of the sons of Israel and convince them that God knows of their difficulties and that He has visited the sons of Israel. 143 pages.
  • A verse-by-verse study of Exodus has just begun.  Right now just the bare-bones exegesis of Exodus 1-3 are posted (word-by-word exegesis, 3 translations, and very basic commentary).  Access is through Exodus Links (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD), which includes access to a 450 page exegesis of the entire book.  It will probably be several years before the complete exegesis of any chapter is posted.  6/9/16
  • The Levirate Marriage Arrangement (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) uploaded 6/6/2016.  This is a fairly obscure marriage arrangement found in the Bible, which has gained some notoriety in, of all places, the gay marriage movement.  Gay marriage advocates made the argument, there are a bunch of weird marriage arrangements found in the Bible.  Since they are in the Bible, that means that Christians and Jews believe that such marriages must be from God.  Gay marriage is no more weird than any of these arrangements, so Christians and Jews should support gay marriage."  The distortions of the gay marriage movement have been already discussed in Marriage Alternatives in the Bible (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  The custom of levirate marriage is discussed in greater detail, so that it is obvious that this sort of marriage was (1) probably not original with God and (2) of great benefit to women in the ancient world.  9 pages.
  • Documentary Hypothesis (also known as the JEPD Theory)  (HTML)   (PDF)   (WPD)  Many years ago, some theologians had been convinced that no one wrote during the era of Moses, and, therefore, they needed a theory to explain his writings.  The theory that was developed was quite convoluted, as in involved several sets of people or individuals who wrote at various times (hundreds of years after Moses was alive), the books which became the Pentateuch.  Later others wove these narratives together; and, ultimately, sold these writings as having come from Moses, hundreds of years later, even though they would have suddenly appeared on the scene.  This convoluted and preposterous theory is still taught today in many seminaries.  Although this doctrine has been posted on my website for many years, this is a major update with a great deal of additional material added.  This study is not for most people; but, if you have ever questioned the Mosaic authorship of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, this study may help to answer questions that you may have.  Posted 6/3/2016. 12 pages.
  • 1Kings 4 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).updated with information from Deut. 17 5/20/2016.
  • Deuteronomy 17 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD)           Laws for Idolatry, the Death Penalty,a Higher Court, a King

    Uploaded 5/19/2016.  Deut. 17 is simply a continuation of Deut. 16, somewhat arbitrarily divided. Moses continues speaking to a number of mostly unrelated issues (although one can sense a train of thought): Moses speaks of the sort of sacrifice which is unacceptable, and, having spoken about the right way to worship God, he then speaks of those who are idolaters, who are subject to penalty of death for their idolatry. One must be careful here—Israel was not to execute someone merely on the
    deut17trans.jpg

    testimony of a single person. That leads, logically, to the courts, and how sometimes and issue might come before the court that was impossible for a judge to decide. He was given the option to take this case to a higher court, with the understanding that he must obey and enforce the decision of the higher court. That is essentially the exercise of executive power, which brings to mind the idea of a king—the next topic that Moses explores in this chapter.

    A reasonable question to ask is, since God knew that the Israelites would eventually demand a king, why did He not just let them have Moses and then Joshua as their first two kings? The exegesis of Deut. 17 will clearly answer this question.

    This same section has been criticized as having been added hundreds of years later, in order to justify the concept of a king in Israel (some people cannot accept the idea of prophecy in the Bible and they reject it every time they come across it). I will demonstrate that no one added to the Word of God here, and provide not only a doctrine lifted from Dr. Bob Utley, but provide additional logical arguments to show that adding a passage like this to the Bible would be impossible to do.

    There is also a question about the king and war horses. There is a verse in this chapter (Deut. 17:16) which seems to indicate that a king over Israel should not have a cavalry. This will be explained correctly; along with an excellent up-to-date application. I am unaware of any commentator explaining this verse correctly, let alone give it an application that we can all understand.

    Sometimes, in just a few words, Moses conveys some amazing truths. The book of Deuteronomy is a great advance on the concept of inspiration of Scripture; and what he says here in this chapter—and you will miss it if you simply read through the chapter—is he equates his own words with the words of God. This is the same Moses, in the book of Exodus, is so careful to distinguish what God says from everything else.

    How do you understand the laws found in the Torah, and apply them to client nation United States? Many believers struggle with this. What do we disapprove of? What laws do we follow? Are there laws that we can disregard in the United States today? Deut. 17 talks about a king, limiting his wives, gold and silver, and horses. Is there any application of this to today’s world? A discussion of this is begun.

    Doctrines covered in this chapter: the Death Penalty in the Mosaic Economy; the Doctrine of Separation; the Doctrine of the Priesthood; the Doctrine of Authority;

    Interesting discussions include: Global Warming as today’s Gaia Religion; Papal infallibility (there is claim that a verse in this chapter affirms this false doctrine); the Concepts of Inspiration and the Recognition of the Old and New Testament Canons as an organic process; How easy would it have been to change the Bible around later on in history (adding a few verses here and there); What is the place of the United States in today’s world; the title of Deuteronomy; and Applying the Torah to Modern Nations today.

    A sincere attempt is made with each chapter of the Word of God to find parallels in today’s society or in today’s political system. Since the Bible is the Word of God, we should expect to often find passages which have application to our lives here and now. 269 pages.

  • Marriage Alternatives in the Bible (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Updated 4/19/2016.  The picture on the right has been distributed throughout the internet, to hundreds if not thousands of web pages. What it purports to do is list a number of different marriage configurations which are found in the Bible. Their purposes for this graphic are: (1) to shake the faith of thAlternate marriages in
                                          the Biblee believer; and (2) to sell gay marriage (which this movement has renamed marriage equality). What they are not interested in is truth. What the Bible really says about the alternate marriages listed is not of any interest to these people. No one is going to read this examination of alternate marriages in the Bible and say, “Oops, got that one wrong. Let me redo this graphic to reflect that.” The study which follows is for believers; this is an examination of these passages for any believer who saw this graphic and perhaps was a little shaken by it.  This doctrine has been updated with a better explanation of the Levirate Marriage from the viewpoint of the woman.  This is a strange custom in ancient societies, and it is rarely understood because it is explained from the male viewpoint.  When we look at this from the woman's viewpoint, this custom becomes much easier to understand.  I believe that this is a unique approach.
  • 1Kings 4 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).              Solomon’s Cabinet, Kingdom and Wealth
    kings_links2.gif

    1Kings 4 stands out because it is not really a continuation of the narrative of 1Kings 1–3, but gives an overview of the reign of Solomon. His chief officers and captains are named, along with their responsibilities. We also get a feel for the tremendous operation that the government of Solomon was. It was very well organized and quite large (because the population of Israel was large). We learn both of Solomon’s great wisdom and of the wonderful prosperity of that era.

    1Kings 4:25 (a graphic); from A Little Perspective; accessed April 15, 2016.

    Because Solomon’s wisdom is compared to that of other ancients, we take a brief look at some ancient wisdom literature. Afterwards, you should have an appreciation for the depth of the wisdom of the Scriptures as well as for the preservation of Scriptures from this same era.

    This would be such an easy chapter to skim through in 3 minutes and go directly to chapter 5, but this is quite an amazing and inspiring chapter. There were a number of times I was inspired to make observations and applications quite pertinent to the day in which we live. In fact, rarely do I come upon a chapter with so many applications to our lives today. For instance, why were Americans so happy in the 1950's and early 1960's, but are so miserable today, even though we have so much more stuff today than we did then? This study helps us to understand that. Another application to today is, what does a good leader do with his military during peacetime? This is something that liberal America deals with constantly, hoping to reduce the military footprint and shift all of the money over to the government to distribute.

    There is a very important question to discuss: How could Solomon be so wise and the country so prosperous, to all of a sudden, go to crap at the end of Solomon’s reign. What happened. What happened to Solomon’s wisdom; and why did this great nation enjoying great prosperity suddenly sputter and come to a halt?


    Solomon’s leadership teaches us a great deal about leadership in American today; what did he do that was right? How can we imitate Solomon today? 292 pages.

  • 1Kings 3 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded March 16, 2016.

    1kings3trans.jpg

    In 1Kings 3, God speaks to Solomon in a dream, and offers to fulfill whatever request that he has of God. Solomon asks for wisdom. God approves of his choice and tells Solomon that he will receive much more than that.

    The last half of 1Kings 3 is the famous court case of two women coming before Solomon, each claiming to be the mother of the same child.

    Solomon, in many ways, is defined by this chapter. He asks wisdom from God and receives it; and this gives us the opportunity to discuss what happened. In the future, Solomon will become a failure near the middle or end of his reign as king—so we have to figure out, if God gave him wisdom, how could he fail?

    We studied the doctrine of prostitution, which, interestingly enough, I could not find on any doctrinal site.

    We took the opportunity to discuss the nature of worship in Israel and why neither David nor Solomon brought the Ark of God to the Tent of Meeting, and placed it inside, as God originally designed it to be. 241 pages

  • The High Places  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) updated 2/28/2016.  Although we often associate the "high places" with heathen worship; it is not always used in this way.  9 pages
  • Proverbs 10 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Righteousness versus Wickedness; Wisdom versus Folly

    Chapter 10 begins a whole new section in the book of Proverbs. We think of proverbs as pithy, self-contained sayings which illustrate fundamental truths (often establishment truths). This is what we find in Prov. 10, a chapter primarily of antithetical distichs.

    Because of the nature of the proverb, it is much more difficult to organize Prov. 10 (although some sections of this chapter lend themselves to organization). There is no simple approach like, this is the section on wisdom, this is the section on love, etc. At no time did I come across a person who organized a chapter, and remarked, “Okay, I get it; that makes sense.”

    A word should be said about the concentrated study of the remainder of Proverbs: don’t. I found this one chapter to be quite exhausting. Footnote When it comes to the study of this material, you may want to limit yourself to a chapter at a time, or a particular topic, or, on occasion, a simple read through.

    Furthermore, whereas, a pastor might reasonably teach Prov. 1–9 as a cohesive unit over a period of months or years; that same pastor would not serve his congregation well to cover the rest of Proverbs in a similar fashion. With the remainder of Proverbs, it is better taught a chapter at a time, or taught from the standpoint of a particular subject area.

    Consider it a very rich food. It is wonderful in small doses, but it is not to be taken as the entire meal.

    I have introduced two new summary tables in this chapter. Each half of each verse has a message. If there were 3 or more commentators which had something interesting to say about the verse, I gathered them into a table. When it was possible, I ended the table with a list of illustrations from Bullinger.

    At the end of each verse—and proverbs really lend themselves to this approach—I have listed perhaps a half-dozen translations, some various commentators on the entire verse, and then complete the table with a list of some parallel verses (because there is generally a contrast of ideas in each proverb, parallel verses may speak to one half or the other of the proverb).

    If you wanted information or inspiration on a particular proverb, these tables would be the place to go for a quick summary (they may also be accessed at the Charts, Graphics and Short Doctrines links).


    As in Prov. 1, I probably went overboard with the quotations of other commentators, registering over 800 footnotes. Someday, I will need to go back and weed some of these out and perhaps edit out as much as 100 pages. In any case, the idea is to provide as much relevant material as possible, so that you can read and understand each proverb.

    There are a plethora of topics found in this chapter as well as doctrines from the Word of God. Topics found: Advising the Pastor-teacher about teaching this portion of Proverbs; Wealth (the complications of; and believer and unbeliever and wealth); Work, the Work Ethic; work and the believer; European Socialism; Laziness and Television; Personal Integrity; Gay Marriage and the Believer; Hatred; Love Covers all Sins; True Knowledge; Laying Up Knowledge; Material Wealth; the Proper Use of Wealth; Life Comes with Rules; Believers and Verbal Sins; the Blessing of God; Hostility Toward Wealth; Lengthen Lives, Shortened Lives; and Expectations of Life. Doctrines presented: Antithetical Parallelism; Wealth; Diligence and Prosperity; Redeeming the Time; the Variety of Spiritual Gifts; Wealth and Poverty; Authority; Sins of the Tongue; the Way of God; and the Problem Solving Devices. Quite obviously, there are far more topics and doctrines found in this chapter as compared to most.

    There are four discussions in this study which are quite important:

    proverbs_links6.gif

    Gay Marriage and the Believer; Dealing with Sin in Your Home or Around the Church; the Varieties of Spiritual Gifts, and Life Comes with Rules. All of these discussions relate directly to your individual life and the things that you say and do when interfacing with friends, family members and business associates.


    Every attempt has been made to make this a self-contained unit where all the information you need to find on Prov. 10 are found in this document. 410 pages.

  • Liberalism, Conservatism and Christianity, updated 2/15/2015   (HTML)   (PDF)  (WPD).  This doctrine covers such topics as Abortion, Anti-Semitism, Atheism, Change, Conservation and Nature, Education, Eminent Domain, Environmentalism, Evolution, Gay Rights, Homosexuality, Global Warming, Government Regulations, Guantanamo Bay Prison for Enemy Combatants, Homelessness, Income Inequity, Income Redistribution, Inheritance Tax, Islam, Islam and Child Sacrifice, Land Ownership—National, Land Ownership—Personal, Marriage, The Military, Missionary Activity, Morality, National Threats, Nationalism versus Internationalism, Nuclear Disarmament, Patriotism, Political Activism, Poverty, Racial Issues, Reparations, Revolution, Separation of Church and State, Socialism, Taxation, Taxing the Rich, War, The Work Ethic.  These issues are covered briefly, giving the general liberal position, the general conservative position, and then what the Bible says.  There is also a 29 page addendum where some of these issues are explored in more depth, as the format--side by side columns--does not lend itself to an in depth approach to each topic.  Everything is hyperlinked, so it is easy to go to whatever contemporary issue interests you.  Recently added: eminent domain, the family unit, gun control, transgender issues, and wealth inequality. 70 pages.
  • The Doctrine of Socialism  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  updated and expanded 2/15/2016.  We face several great attacks today on Christianity and the Laws of Divine Establishment: (1) Communism and socialism; (2) Humanism and modern American culture; (3) Islam.  A form of socialism is first found in the Bible (there is no new thing under the sun); in our American history (before the time of Karl Marx); and it appears that our country is heading toward socialism.  Therefore, it is important to understand what this ideology is all about and what does the Bible say about it.  A current news article about current conditions in socialist Europe has been added. 15 pages.
  • Miscellaneous Types in Genesis (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Posted 2/11/2016.  In studying the book of Genesis, we have come across several types of Christ.  A "type" is a person, event or institution that looks forward to Jesus Christ, and portrays some aspect (s) of His Person.  These are never trivial parallels, but often reveal, in part, the unique aspects of the Lord's Person.  "You pore over the Scriptures [= the Old Testament] because you presume that by them you possess eternal life. These are the very words that testify about Me," said Jesus to the religious types on the Sabbath (John 5:39; Berean Study Bible).  Abraham's servant and Melchizedek are both presented here as types.  Also included is a set of links to other types which have already been posted.  The study of the tremendous amount of typology found in the early books of the Bible often serves to confirm the Reality of Jesus Christ, His Divine nature, and His Divine purpose, to die for our sins.  Typology is difficult to study objectively and still reject the inspiration of the Bible.
  • Benjamin as a Type of Christ.  Benjamin in his birth was given two names, one by his mother who died; and one by his father who lived.  These names and his birth look forward to the Person of Christ and His two natures.  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Posted 2/11/2016.
  • The Doctrine of Rape (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Uploaded 2/10/2016.  There is a great deal of confusion about rape and the Bible; and there are even those who think that, man was so primitive then, that raping a woman and then making her your wife was the order of the day.  This study dispels such notions; and refers to actual passages in Scripture which deal with rape.  There are two cultural differences in the Old Testament era which are often ignored: (1) Women were rarely raped in that era because women were not allowed to run around with men at an early age.  In fact, very often, women might find themselves promised to a man from a very young age.  (2) As a result, there is no word for rape in the ancient Hebrew.
  • Basic Exegesis Series; AKA Genesis Lessons #301-380. (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  We begin these lessons by following Jacob, for the most part.  He cheats his twin brother Esau out of a blessing from Isaac, and then, because of the anger of Esau, finds that he must leave the land of promise.  Jacob works for his uncle Laban outside of Canaan, and marries Laban's two daughters.  In this set of lessons, we examine the doctrines of Hatred, Emotions, Heart, Emotional Revolt, Reversionism, the Spiritual Life in the Old and New Testaments, Christian Giving, Biblical Marriage, Alternative Forms of Marriage in the Bible.  We also examine many of the so-called Bible contradictions, the Uniqueness of the Bible, Why Moses Did Not Write Genesis, the Reasons Why Genesis was Written at the Time of the Events of Genesis, Humility, Jacob and Esau, Rape in the Bible, God's 6 Appearances to Jacob, Benjamin as a Type of Christ, and the Parallels between Jacob the Man and Israel the Nation. Some of these doctrines are unique to this study, and found nowhere else.  2/10/16
  • A verse-by-verse study of Exodus has just begun.  Right now just the bare-bones exegesis of Exodus 1 and Exodus 2 are posted (word-by-word exegesis, 3 translations, and very basic commentary).  Access through Exodus Links (HTML)  (PDF).  It will probably be several years before the complete exegesis of any chapter is posted.  1/31/16
  • Proverbs 1–9 Introduction A Father’s Advice to His Son: Become Wise (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).


    Word Cloud for Proverbs 1–9 (ESV) 

    prov1-9trans.jpg
    Although there is a lot of material from other commentators, there is also material in this introduction which is unique to this study, including Jesus Christ in Proverbs 1–9 and God in Proverbs 1–9.

    This document includes discussion of the vocabulary of Prov. 1–9, quite a number of outlines of these first 9 chapters (some simple and some quite complex), an overview of the format found in these 9 chapters along with some treatment of the translations used and why they are classified as they are, and the authorship specifically of these first 9 chapters.

    Also included is a full translation of these first 9 chapters.

    Even though I am not completely happy with my organization of this material, dividing up the introduction to this section of Proverbs from the rest of Proverbs is the correct thing to do. 71 pages.

  • Proverbs 9 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). The Banquets of Lady Wisdom and Madam Folly

    Uploaded 12/15/2015.

    Chapter 9 presents the final arguments of both Lady Wisdom and Mistress Folly, and completes the first section of the book of Proverbs.


    Confused Human Viewpoint:

    Khalil Gibran: Pain and foolishness lead to great bliss and complete knowledge, for Eternal Wisdom created nothing under the sun in vain. Footnote

    Witold Gombrowicz, Polish author: Foolishness is a twin sister of wisdom. Footnote

    Foolishness:

    Mark Slouka, American novelist: It's a race between your foolishness and your allotted days. Good luck. Footnote

    Rumi: You know the value of every article of merchandise, but if you don't know the value of your own soul, it's all foolishness. Footnote

    Sophocles: Foolishness is indeed the sister of wickedness. Footnote


    Interestingly enough, the first proverbs actually found in the book of Proverbs are found in this chapter. There are 3 proverbs of wisdom and 1 proverb of foolishness.

    proverbs_links5.gif
    Proverbs 9:8 (The NIV) (a graphic); from Wife Begins; accessed December 12, 2015. This is one of the 3 proverbs of wisdom.

    Wisdom and Folly pursue the same categories of young men, but with very different intentions. Wisdom seeks to provide what is lacking, to repair the deficiency; whereas, Folly seeks to exploit that deficiency. Wisdom is there for the benefit of the young man; Folly is there to achieve her own ends. Wisdom looks to extend the life of those influenced by her; Folly seeks to end to lives of those who follow her.


    There is certainly more going on than a morality play here. Mistress Folly represents human viewpoint and cosmic thinking; and she is always pursuing the souls of men. In this world, the key to life, is what you think. Satan always wants your thinking to be opposed to God’s. This cannot be over-emphasized this more. 161 pages.

  • The Doctrine of Scoffing (or, Scorn) (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Uploaded 12/6/2015.  The scoffer not only rejects the offer of grace of God and entry into the plan of God, but he makes fun of those who believe this.  When given the opportunity, he will scorn and mock such people.  This 4 page doctrine will be a part of the Proverbs 9 exegesis (when posted).
  • Liberalism, Conservatism and Christianity, updated 12/6/2015   (HTML)   (PDF)  (WPD).  This doctrine covers such topics as Abortion, Anti-Semitism, Atheism, Change, Conservation and Nature, Education, Eminent Domain, Environmentalism, Evolution, Gay Rights, Homosexuality, Global Warming, Government Regulations, Guantanamo Bay Prison for Enemy Combatants, Homelessness, Income Inequity, Income Redistribution, Inheritance Tax, Islam, Islam and Child Sacrifice, Land Ownership—National, Land Ownership—Personal, Marriage, The Military, Missionary Activity, Morality, National Threats, Nationalism versus Internationalism, Nuclear Disarmament, Patriotism, Political Activism, Poverty, Racial Issues, Reparations, Revolution, Separation of Church and State, Socialism, Taxation, Taxing the Rich, War, The Work Ethic.  These issues are covered briefly, giving the general liberal position, the general conservative position, and then what the Bible says.  There is also a 29 page addendum where some of these issues are explored in more depth, as the format--side by side columns--does not lend itself to an in depth approach to each topic.  Everything is hyperlinked, so it is easy to go to whatever contemporary issue interests you.  Recently added: gun control and transgender issues. 66 pages.
  • Proverbs 8 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Wisdom Calls Out

    Prov. 8 is offered up in contrast to Prov. 7. In Prov. 7, we had the temptation of the immoral adulteress, calling out to the young man in the night; but in Prov. 8, we have Lady Wisdom calling to all believers from the most public places. We are warned as to the dangers of hooking up with the married woman (who represents false doctrine and human viewpoint thinking) in Prov. 7; we are encouraged to take advantage of the wisdom of God, which is offered to us in Prov. 8 (however, we do not acquire wisdom overnight).

    We studied a variety of doctrines in this chapter, including The Wisdom of God; 2 Doctrines of Evil; Grace Apparatus for Perception; Fear of the Lord; the Concept of Divine Institutions; the Fifth Divine Institution (Human government); the Royal Family Honor Code; the Trinity in the Old Testament; the Omniscience of God; the Water Cycle and the Bible; and the Dual Authorship of the Scriptures.

    There are several very important topics discussed in detail in this exegetical study: the Dual Authorship of Scriptures (and what that applies); the great availability of Bible doctrine in this day and age (and how it is being rejected, even in the United States); and how the Bible accurately refers to scientific phenomenon from time to time.

    For believers who do not really understand the importance of reaching maturity so that quality divine good can be produced, an excellent illustration is given to explain why this is of the utmost importance.

    proverbs_links4.gif
    We saw many applications of the principles found in this chapter to modern politics (specifically, the dishonest language of President Obama); and the importance of Bible doctrine to the founding fathers. 340 pages.
    Lady Wisdom by Adam Howie (apparently a photo of something that he created); from Red Bubble; accessed November 26, 2015. He sells this image to hang on the wall, to decorate the back of a laptop, or as a throw pillow. Footnote
  • The Divine Institutions (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Revised somewhat and posted 11/8/2015.  These are the 5 fundamental institutions established by God for believers and unbelievers alike. 38 pages
  • Fear of the Lord (in the Old Testament)  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Updated 11/7/2015.  The phrase "Fear of the Lord" is found throughout the Old Testament, and a few times in the New.  It is important for believers to have an understanding of what this phrase means. Quotation, graphics and a better definition added, along with a discussion of "Perfect love casts out all fear." 12 pages.
  • Proverbs 7 Seduced by the Adulterous Woman (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).

    Proverbs 7 concentrates on the subject of adultery, and what the author of this chapter (probably King David) personally observed. He is teaching Bible doctrine and divine establishment principles to his sons, so that they will not make the same mistakes.

    Quotations:

    J. Vernon McGee: This young man is taking a walk down the wrong street. Footnote

    Henry Scougal: Youth is a time of life wherein we have too much pride to be governed by others, and too little wisdom to govern ourselves. Footnote

    Julian Lennon: Dad could talk about peace and love out loud to the world, but he could never show it to the people who supposedly meant the most to him: his wife and son. How can you talk about peace and love and have a family in bits and pieces - no communication, adultery, divorce? You can't do it, not if you're being true and honest with yourself. Footnote

    Besides the topic of adultery, there seems to be a parallel narrative occurring under the surface—the lure and flattery from the adulterous woman, is much like the lure and flatter of false doctrine, human viewpoint, and cosmic thinking. The parallels are remarkable.
    prov7_13-20b.jpg

    Included in this study is a new look at the Edification Complex Structure, having both a man-ward and a God-ward view; the Doctrine of Adultery; a Parallel Interpretation of Proverbs 7; and a very important new doctrine: Why didn't God just give us a simple list of what to do and what not to do?


    Like all previous studies, there will be up-to-date applications to the events of today, so that you can take the doctrine from the Bible and apply it to what we observe every day. 191 pages.
  • The Sin unto Death (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  Updated 10/18/2015.  The sin unto death is not a particular sin, but the final stage of discipline for the believer whose life has gone awry.  Some graphics and two additional related doctrines were added.  I originally found the Doctrine of the Sin unto Death posted in 3 different places, and in each case, it seemed incomplete.  The bulk of this doctrine is compiled from those 3 places.  8 pages.
  • The Doctrine of Work (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Uploaded 10/8/2015.  This is one of the most important doctrines found in the Word of God for this generation, and yet has been so often ignored by our churches.  Work is the second divine institution; Adam worked in the Garden when he was without sin; and Adam worked on the earth after the Fall.  The Bible many times affirms the importance of hard work; the Bible never presents sloth as a viable alternative.  As a divine institution, this is true for believers and unbelievers alike.  In client nation United States year of our Lord 2015, it is clear that we as a nation are on the decline, and one of those tell-tale signs is the massive number of people who are no longer working.  So many are on welfare, section 8 housing, unemployment, disability and retirement (the Bible never speaks of the glories of retirement).  As I write this, 94 million Americans, out of a population of 220 million or so, are not working and are not looking for a job--and yet one political party calls our for more welfare and food stamps!  Whereas the Bible clearly urges charity toward the poor, it does not advocate that nearly half of a nation's population ought to be supported by the other half.  This is an outstanding study, primarily pulled from the exegesis of Proverbs 6 (but more will be added to this doctrine as time passes).  (This is not the Doctrine of Works) 46 pages.
  • Proverbs 6 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD).  Uploaded 10/6/2015 

    John Ortberg: Sloth is the failure to do what needs to be done when it needs to be done - like the kamikaze pilot who flew seventeen missions.

    Jon Foreman: Greed, envy, sloth, pride and gluttony: these are not vices anymore. No, these are marketing tools. Lust is our way of life. Envy is just a nudge towards another sale. Even in our relationships we consume each other, each of us looking for what we can get out of the other. Our appetites are often satisfied at the expense of those around us. In a dog-eat-dog world we lose part of our humanity.

    Ronald Reagan (I think this was in response to his taking naps during his presidency): I've heard that hard work never killed anyone, but I say why take the chance? 

    Judge Roy Moore: When we forget God, we lose the only true basis for morality and ethics, and we are cast upon the shifting sands of moral relativism in which anything goes, including lying, cheating and stealing.

    Gary North: The predictability and impartiality of biblical law are to undergird the social order. All those who break the law are subject to its penalties. This points to the final judgment. God does not “grade on a curve.” Paul wrote: “All have sinned and come short of the glory of God” (Rom. 3:23).


    proverbs_links3.gif

    Unlike the previous chapters of Proverbs, Prov. 6 covers a wide range of topics, although one can certainly see a relationship between each topic going into the next. (1) In life, we all accumulate debt; we all are under a variety of obligations. David tells Solomon to honor his obligations; what he says binds him to that thing. (2) David then speaks about the importance of hard work, and talks about the ant and his industriousness (obviously, David did not own a house cat as a pet). (3) The man who does not work hard is covered in the next section, the worthless man. (4) Obviously God does not care for laziness; but the things which He hates are then listed. (5) An oft-time repeated refrain of Proverbs is for the hearer/reader to pay attention to the doctrinal teaching of his parents and keep that in his soul at all times. Knowing Bible doctrine and divine establishment principles, (6) keeps a man from getting involved with the wrong women and (7) keeps a man from committing adultery.

    As an aside, the reference work on ants was fascinating to me.

    There is a marked difference between the way a father relates to his son and how a mother does. This difference explains why so many children raised without a father grow up to be little thugs (and sometimes, lifetime thugs). Hidden in this study is how mothers and fathers raise their children differently; and what a single mother must do in order to keep that from happening.

    If you teach your children properly, then they will respect hard work and they will be willing to work hard. They will avoid premarital sex and intoxicants. As a result, most children of believers grow up to be materially successful. A portion of this study is devoted to living the spiritual life in a material world. Although I draw upon a great many sources and include a great deal of commentary within this document, there is nearly always be information unique to this commentary. One thing which I have not read elsewhere is the spiritual application of surety (the first 5 verses of this chapter). However, there is an application. Surety foreshadows where we should place our own faith.

    Doctrines covered in Proverbs 6: The Doctrines of Work, Evil, Pride, Murder, Lying, and Adultery. Also, The Western Work Ethic; Living the Spiritual Life in a Material World.

    Important studies in this chapter: The importance of living up to your word and to the agreements which you sign; the importance of working.

    There are a great many applications of this chapter to modern life, including the concept of evil and an example of someone who embodies evil. Modern examples of arrogance and sowing discord among brothers are given. Also, a great (and relevant) Peanuts cartoon. 290 pages.

  • The Doctrine of Socialism  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  updated and expanded 10/4/2015.  We face several great attacks today on Christianity and the Laws of Divine Establishment: (1) Communism and socialism; (2) Humanism and modern American culture; (3) Islam.  A form of socialism is first found in the Bible (there is no new thing under the sun); in our American history (before the time of Karl Marx); and it appears that our country is heading toward socialism.  Therefore, it is important to understand what this ideology is all about and what does the Bible say about it.  A graphic and some additional text has been added.
  • Liberalism, Conservatism and Christianity, updated 10/4/2015   (HTML)   (PDF)  (WPD).  This doctrine covers such topics as Abortion, Anti-Semitism, Atheism, Change, Conservation and Nature, Education, Eminent Domain, Environmentalism, Evolution, Gay Rights, Homosexuality, Global Warming, Government Regulations, Guantanamo Bay Prison for Enemy Combatants, Homelessness, Income Inequity, Income Redistribution, Inheritance Tax, Islam, Islam and Child Sacrifice, Land Ownership—National, Land Ownership—Personal, Marriage, The Military, Missionary Activity, Morality, National Threats, Nationalism versus Internationalism, Nuclear Disarmament, Patriotism, Political Activism, Poverty, Racial Issues, Reparations, Revolution, Separation of Church and State, Socialism, Taxation, Taxing the Rich, War, The Work Ethic.  There are 35+ pages on these issues, giving the general liberal position, the general conservative position, and then what the Bible says.  There is also a 29 page addendum where some of these issues are explored in more depth, as the format--side by side columns--does not lend itself to an in depth approach to each topic.  Everything is hyperlinked, so it is easy to go to whatever contemporary issue interests you.  Recently added: more links, more text and more graphics.
  • Genesis Lessons #301-360. (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  posted 9/30/2015.  We begin these lessons by following Jacob, for the most part.  He cheats his twin brother Esau out of a blessing from Isaac, and then, because of the anger of Esau, finds that he must leave the land of promise.  Jacob works for his uncle Laban outside of Canaan, and marries Laban's two daughters.  20 years after moving the Paddan-Aram,  Jacob leaves (as per the directive of God), taking his wives and children with him.  His Uncle Laban chases after him and catches up with him; and, soon thereafter, Jacob comes face to face with the Lord Jesus Christ, Who wrestles him.  In the most recent set of lessons, we examine the doctrines of The Husband's Responsibility in Marriage and the Function of Angels.  We also studied changing societal norms, Terah's Genealogy, Rom. 8:28 in the Life of Jacob, the Meaning of Jacob's Wrestling Match, and modern-day land disputes between the Jews and the Palestinians.
  • The Sins of the Tongue (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Some material has been appended to this doctrine.  9/21/2015.
  • The Doctrine of Sin (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) is expanded with links to a variety of sins and a sin list.  This doctrine was compiled; it is not original work.  Uploaded  9/21/2015
  • Proverbs 5 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded 9/4/2015. 

    David talks about one of his favorite subjects in this chapter of Proverbs: women—in particular, the right woman for any man (and, in this case, it is the right woman for Solomon, his very young son). One of the things which is fascinating is, David had 10 wives and 10 mistresses; Solomon had 1000 wives and mistresses; and yet David is teaching his son about the importance of one wife, of one relationship, of one love. This is the boundary given by God for personal and sexual love. The reason that this is fascinating is, most people like to justify themselves. Most people like to point to things that they have done and say, “You may think that I got it wrong, but what I was doing was a-okay.” But David does not do this. Solomon, in recording this information, does not do this. Both men, David by his teaching and Solomon by his recording of this information, testify to God’s plan for men and women, which is not the plan which they followed. At no time in any of their writings does either man try to justify their own mistakes. Solomon never writes, a man with one wife is blessed and a man with two is double-blessed. David never says, you know, in this line, we men of Judah have the sexual vigor of 20 men, so we need to have many women at our beck and call.

    proverbs_links2.gif
    Much of this chapter can be taken as allegorical, which only one or two commentators have done. Furthermore, from the earliest times, a significant portion of the chapter has been incorrectly interpreted. A correct interpretation will be given, along with a complete argument as to why the previous explanation was wrong and why the explanation found here is correct.

    Doctrines covered: Wormwood; Flattery; Lusts of the Soul; Sheol; the Cosmic System; Sexual Love in Marriage; and the Sin unto Death.

    Important topics covered: Islam and Multiple Wives; The Cost of Sexual Immorality; Children being raised without fathers; Marriage and the 3rd Divine Institution; the Omniscience of God; and a Metaphorical Approach to Prov. 5.

    This is one of the most common sense and applicable chapters of the Bible. 196 pages.

  • The Doctrine of Homosexuality was updated 9/3/2015  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD). The two doctrines from below, dealing with Ruth and Naomi as well as David and Jonathan, were added to the appendix.
  • Ruth 4 was updated to include a brief section on a recent perversion on the contents of the book of Ruth from the gay movement (some claim that Ruth and her mother-in-law Naomi were lesbian lovers).  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)   2Samuel 1 (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  was also updated with similar material (the gay movement alleges that David and Jonathon were gay lovers and possibly even married).  These silly notions are put to rest.  Updated 9/3/15.
  • The Doctrine of Lust (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) uploaded 8/28/2015.  Surprisingly enough, most of the doctrinal sources that I refer to do not have the doctrine of lust.  This one is fairly basic, looking at the varieties of lusts, the Biblical passages on these various lusts, and the solution to the lust problem.  2 pages.
  • Genesis 26 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD) uploaded 8/9/2015.


    William Wenstrom, Jr.: Unbelief is the failure to take into account and acknowledge the character and nature of God, His presence and His Word.

    Kukis: In this life, as believers, we have both promises and direction from God. They will never be in conflict with one another.

    Kukis: God knows our limitations and what God requires of us, we are able to do.

    Kukis: Anytime a political movement encourages mental attitude sins, you know you are in the wrong movement.

    Kukis: God blessing one man does not mean that God withholds blessing from others.

    genesislinks.gif

    It ought to surprise you, as it did me, that there is a lot of application to be found in the chapter. The concept of envy is examined in great deal, along with two doctrines dealing with envy (the second one deals with envy and socialism); and there is a great deal of commentary about socialism in this study. This is done because communists in Latin America were having trouble making headway with the Catholics there, so they began to teach that Jesus favored socialism and that the Bible was all about socialism and feeding the poor and the needy (even though socialism does not actually do this, it purports to do this). So, instead of communism butting heads with Catholicism, communist principles and doctrine began to be taught as if they had come out of the Bible (this is known as liberation theology). As a result, even the most recent pope (I forget his name; I write this in 2015) has a plethora of socialistic ideas (he is from Latin America, if memory serves). Many of the doctrines and commentary in this chapter put to rest the idea that the Bible teaches socialism.

    There are 3 very similar incidents in the Bible, and this chapter examines all of them together. Because Isaac is moved around quite a bit, we study the geographic will of God as well as the will of God in general. We see that Abraham and Isaac both lived in a unique era, when all the survivors of the flood began to die out; and how that related to God’s promises to Abraham.

    Important doctrines covered: The Doctrine of Envy; the Politics of Envy; Socialism and Envy; The Relativity of Wealth; The Doctrine of Mental Attitude Sins; The Best Use of Our Time; Relocating to Go to a Doctrinal Church; Problems with the Current Democratic Party. How to Live Your Life (as a believer). Isaac in the New Testament.

    Important concepts explored: We study how God has blessed the United States; how our schools are funded. We study the dramatic change of mores in the United States where gay marriage is accepted by a majority of people; we see how an entire society can be changed by propagandizing the youth of that society. We examine the bankrupt moral system which attacks and steals from the rich and exalts the poor. We study how higher taxes on the wealthy does not make life any better for the poor. You may have noticed, when corresponding with some people, that they use the word/notation G-d. An explanation as to why they do this and why this is stupid.

    This is an outstanding and very contemporary study. This not only deals with current political movements, but also answers the question, what should I, as a believer in Jesus Christ, be doing today? 345 pages.

  • Genesis Lessons #301-350. (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  posted 7/22/2015.  We begin these lessons by following Jacob, for the most part.  He cheats his twin brother Esau out of a blessing from Isaac, and then, because of the anger of Esau, finds that he must leave the land of promise.  Jacob works for his uncle Laban outside of Canaan, and marries Laban's two daughters.  In this set of lessons, we examine the doctrines of Hatred, Emotions, Heart, Emotional Revolt, Reversionism, the Spiritual Life in the Old and New Testaments, Christian Giving, Biblical Marriage, Alternative Forms of Marriage in the Bible.  We also examine many of the so-called Bible contradictions, the Uniqueness of the Bible, and Why Moses Did Not Write Genesis.
  • Blessing by Association updated 7/20/2015  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Once a believer begins to mature spiritually, God begins to pour out more blessings upon that believer (called "more grace" or "greater grace").  These blessings overflow to those who are around you.  This doctrine explains and documents the concept of blessing by association.  Added was a short section of clear examples of blessing by association taken out of the Bible.
  •  The List, a 56 pages list of suggested links has been updated 7/19/15 The List  (HTML)   (PDF)   (WPD).. There are 31 states with doctrinal churches in them (most of these churches are small).  By doctrinal, I mean (1) they teach the Word of God, often book by book; (2) they teach salvation by faith alone in Christ alone; (3) they teach the importance of spiritual mechanics, such as, naming one's sins to God in order to be restored to fellowship with God; (4) they teach the importance of knowing the Word of God; (5) they teach grace, dispensations, spiritual mechanics, and (6) provide you a place where you may grow spiritually.  The list of churches was updated somewhat (some of them no longer exist); and the links to online exegesis of books of the Bible was updated.  Every believer needs to be in a local church that facilitates spiritual growth and they need to learn why they are alive right now.
  • The Doctrine of Envy (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD) updated 7/15/2015.  An abbreviated version of this doctrine was added, along with the Doctrine of Envy and Socialism.  Also, a number of quotations were added as well.  One of the mental attitude sins often ignored in Christian teaching is envy.  This is a sin which is actually encouraged today by those who would move us toward socialism.  We are to look to the rich and feel envious, desire their things, and therefore, promote socialism so that we might take these things from them.  Such envy is sinful, and there is no good end for those who allow their envy to rule over them unchecked.
  • The Divine Institutions (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Posted 7/14/2015.  These are the fundamental institutions established by God for believers and unbelievers alike.  This is actually a portion of the Divine Establishment doctrine directly below.
  • Just updated: The Doctrine of the Laws of Divine Establishment 7/14/2015.   (HTML)   (PDF)   (WPD)    The Laws of Divine Establishment are laws which are designed for believers and unbelievers alike.  These laws are constantly under attack.  Minor formatting update with a little editing.  This is the most complete treatment of this topic that I am aware of.
  • The Abrahamic Covenant (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Uploaded July 10, 2015 (actually, this was uploaded a year ago, but I never provided any links to it).  This is essentially taken from the Basic Exegesis Series, starting with Gen.12  15  17.  The first instance of the Abrahamic Covenant is given, followed by ancient and modern examples of "I will bless those who bless you, and curse those who curse you."  Also included is an examination of the Suzerain-Vassal treaty, Circumcision means Regeneration (circumcision was often required to show one's faith in a promise or covenant from God), and a list of God's covenants with Abraham.  Included is a graphic borrowed from Slide Share which gives an overall view of the covenants of the Old Testament.  52 pages. 
  • Genesis 25 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded July 5, 2015.


    genesis2515.gif

    Although much of Genesis 25 deals with the Arab line from Abraham, there is a great deal about Abraham in this chapter study. In fact, one very extensive section of this chapter study, delves into all of the New Testament passages where Abraham is mentioned.

    There is an excellent short section in this study called The Bible, Poverty, Inheritance, Wealth, and Spreading the Wealth Around: There has been a great deal of communist propaganda which has found its way into mainstream liberal thinking, that makes the God of the Bible to appear to be anti-wealth. Abraham, as a case history, shows that this is simply not true.

    Included is an extensive section within Gen. 25: Abraham in the New Testament (this is very much a summation of all that we have covered up to this point; as well as seeing how Abraham is referenced in the New Testament). This is simply a look at every New Testament passage where Abraham is mentioned. Within this study, we get an excellent study of a great many Christian doctrines; including at least one you have not seen before.

    Some commentary, from time to time, will appear to be very political. Such commentary teaches the laws of divine establishment; or is illustrative of a Biblical principle, which is brought into the 21st century. 100 years from now, the principles will remain the same, although the people named from contemporary history will become much less relevant to future generations.

    Like most chapters, which I cover, there will be extensive application to contemporary circumstances, philosophies and personalities. We will study or use as illustrations: President Obama, socialism, spreading the wealth, the Bible’s view of wealth, our actual history,

    We will spend a significant amount of time in the New Testament studying all of the times that Abraham is mentioned by name. This will bring into focus stories from the Bible you may have never heard—like Jesus and the short, rich tax collector. This section is very much the reason for the unusual length of this chapter.

    Regarding twin sons Jacob and Esau, Isaac and Rebekah, their parents, chose to raise them separately. Although most commentators who expressed an opinion about this was negative, I will suggest a reason why Isaac and Rebekah did what they did. This might put them in a different light for you.

    There are several extremely important doctrines and studies presented in this study: Reinterpreting Old Testament Truths (the New Testament does not supplant, overwrite, or replace the Old Testament; it provides another dimension to it that was previously hidden); The Seed of Abraham and the Life of the Believer (which is a series of parallels); Canonicity—who decided what the New Testament would be.

    We study the doctrines of the Human Soul, the Human Spirit, and Morality.

    There are also two sets of genealogies. I understand how some people may not be that interested in those sections. However, do not neglect this chapter of the Word of God because of the genealogies. There is much more to be found in this exegetical study than named above.

    This is a unique and extremely dense study of Gen. 25; it is covered nowhere else in this depth. In fact, it is remarkable to me that some commentaries, like the Bridgeway Bible Commentary, only devote 2 pages of commentary to this chapter. The idea is, you will walk away knowing about as much about Gen. 25 as is humanly possible to know. Furthermore, there are unique contributions to be found within this study of Gen. 25—things you will not read anywhere else. 400 pages.

  • The Ark of the Covenant  (HTML)  (PDF)   (WPD).  The Ark of the Covenant (also known as the Ark of God) is one of the most amazing pieces of furniture in the Tabernacle (and later in the Temple).  This doctrine includes a physical description of the Ark, false theories bout the Ark; the uniqueness of the ark; the Movement of the Ark of God; and How the Ark is a Type of Christ.  The is one of the most accessed doctrines at this site; and this represents an update on this doctrine.  Posted 6/6/2015.
  • Doctrine of the Sabbath (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Posted 6/5/2015.  The Sabbath is clearly one of the Ten Commandments and had great meaning to the Jewish people.  Is this still a command for today?  If so, why; and if not, why not?  There is also a passage in Hebrews which reads, And there remains a Sabbath for the people of God.  That seems pretty clear.  This passage is examined and exegeted as a part of this study.
  • Deuteronomy 34 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Posted 5/30/15

    deut34exegesis.jpg

    Deuteronomy 34 is the final chapter of Deuteronomy, and it is narrative which deals with the death of Moses.

    There are some extremely important studies in this chapter: The Categories of Reasons Why Moses Will Not Go into the Land; How Moses Is a Type of Christ. Since Moses dies in this chapter, dying grace is a part of this study as well.

    Because God shows Moses the land that will be given to Moses, we study both the early boundaries of Israel and the mountains in Israel. We discussed who buried Moses (and there is a surprising consensus here).

    In some incidental studies, we compared the gospels to one another and what order they were probably written (and how this is related to this final chapter of Deuteronomy). 128 pages. 
  • The Essence of God, as per the Pentateuch.  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD). Posted 5/26/2015.  This is the standard doctrine of the Essence of God, but the supporting texts are taken only from the Pentateuch and the book of Job.   This shows that the God of the Old Testament--the God of the Law--is the exact same God that we worship today.
  • The Essence of God  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD). This was posted some time ago, but apparently not listed before.
  • Deuteronomy 4 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded 5/18/2015.


    Quotations:

     George Orwell: To see what is in front of one's nose needs a constant struggle. Footnote

    Matthew Poole: the true greatness of a nation does not consist in pomp or power, or largeness of empire, as commonly men think, but in the righteousness of its laws. Footnote

    Quotations about idolatry:

    Emilio Estevez: What I find interesting is that the people that follow your Twitters are called 'followers.' Talk about false idolatry, right?  Footnote


    Deut. 4 completes the great first sermon of Moses, east of the Jordan River, delivered before Israel is to cross over the Jordan without him. At the end of this chapter, there are two short narratives: the setting up of the cities of refuge east of the Jordan; and an introduction to Deut. 5 (which should have been placed with Deut. 5, but was not).

    There is an extremely important doctrine in this chapter entitled The Bible is Whole and Complete. Moses, in Deut. 4:2 says “You shall not add to the word that I command you, nor take from it, that you may keep the commandments of the LORD your God that I command you.” (ESV). But Joshua writes the final chapter of Deuteronomy; Joshua then writes the book of Joshua; and then various men write the book of the Judges. So, are they not adding to the word that Moses commanded the people of God? This doctrine explains; and is a part of rightly dividing the Word of Truth.

    Contained in this examination of Deut. 4 is perhaps the best, easiest to understand outline of this chapter, which is a series of object lessons, which the Israelites were to think about and learn from.

    deut4translation.jpg
    Moses explains to this generation that they are unique—they have seen the great signs and wonders done by God and they have heard God’s voice. Therefore, they are commanded to tell all that they have seen and heard to their children and grandchildren.

    Topics discussed in this chapter: Deuteronomy and the Suzerain treaties; sexually addictive behavior and homosexuality; homosexuality prohibitions in the Bible and the mixing of divers fabrics; ancient law codes; how to determine if you are in a good church; the national greatness of Britain; why the United States has been so greatly blessed; correctly interpreting and understanding current history (current events); and chapter and verse divisions.

    Doctrines discussed in this chapter: The Fear of the Lord; Idolatry—Ancient and Modern; Categories of Reasons Why Moses Will Not Go Into the Land; and The Exclusivity of God and the Jews.

    As usual, this is the most complete examination of this chapter available. 419 pages.

  • Liberation Theology/Black Liberation Theology  (updated 5/15/15)  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  A former communist spy admits that they developed Liberation Theology.  His testimony and several graphics are added.  This doctrine is examined and laid side-by-side orthodox Christian Doctrine.
  • The Doctrine of War  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD)  updated 5/2/2015 with one of General George Patton's prayers.
  • Homosexuality and the Bible updated 5/2/2015  (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  With some additional commentary on gay marriage and some relevant articles on gay marriage and gay parenting have been added.
  • Deuteronomy 3 (HTML) (PDF) (WPD). Uploaded 3/30/2015.

    If you read Deuteronomy 3 first, you ought to have two questions: (1) how could God leave Moses behind and let the rest of Israel go into the Land of Promise? And (2) how did the Israelites defeat 60 cities in a relatively short period of time?
    deut3trans.jpg

    As in the previous chapter, much of what we find in Deuteronomy 3 is review of events which have just taken place. Everyone in attendance knows these events. Moses explains them so that their spiritual meaning will be understood.

    Moses will remind the people of the tremendous victory over Og of Bashan; how the land east of the Jordan will be give to 2½ tribes (Reuben, Gad and Manasseh), but how they must continue to help their brothers to take the land west of the Jordan River.

    Moses also reminds them that Joshua will lead them at the point of crossing the Jordan and forward; he will lead them into victory over the peoples of Canaan. And they can look back on what God has done for them recently in order to have confidence that God will continue to be with them in battle. Moses himself will not go forward. He will die east of the Jordan River, never having set foot in the Land of Promise.


    There are many important and unique doctrines found in this chapter: Why Won’t Moses Enter the Land with the Children of Israel? And What can we as individual believers take from Moses going this far and no further? And, What are we, cops of the world? These are relatively short doctrines, but there is a lot of information and application to our lives today found in these doctrines. Also very important in the theological realm is, Why Joshua leads the people instead of Moses. There is a great deal of typology which is involved here. However, when you see it all explained, all kinds of things will make perfect sense.

  • Dishonest Anti-Bible Graphics (HTML)  (PDF)  (WPD).  Uploaded 3/23/2015.  There are a great many dishonest graphics posted on the internet.  The internet and email has allowed for those who are against the Bible to devise cleaver anti-Bible graphics, and then to post them on facebook (or, wherever) and then allow these graphics to proliferate.           
  •